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Could paying farmers to sequester carbon reverse climate change?

October 03, 2019 | SectorWatch
CEO David Perry discusses the potential for agriculture to help reverse climate change, highlighting photosynthesis as the “huge innovation” people have been waiting for to address the issue.
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How to Get Rid of Carbon Emissions: Pay Farmers to Bury Them

September 11, 2019 | The Wall Street Journal
Indigo Ag Inc., a Boston- based company specializing in agricultural technology and management, is setting up a market for carbon credits. Companies and consumers with voluntary or compulsory commitments to reduce their carbon footprint can, rather than reduce emissions themselves, pay farmers to do it for them. Via the Indigo Carbon marketplace, they can pay farmers like Mr. Hora $15 to sequester one metric ton of carbon dioxide in the soil.
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Q&A: Is Agriculture the Answer to Climate Change?

August 26, 2019 | Modern Farmer
Modern Farmer recently spoke with Indigo Ag CEO David Perry about how the Terraton Initiative works, and how he intends to overcome the obstacles that brought down other farm-based carbon trading platforms.
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The Terraton Initiative: Working to Remove a Trillion Tons of Carbon

August 26, 2019 | foodtank
The Terraton Initiative embodies one specific goal—to remove 1 trillion metric tons of carbon from Earth’s atmosphere. Indigo Agriculture, an agricultural technology company based in Massachusetts, founded and runs the project. To accomplish this goal, the Initiative aims to use “the awesome potential of the soil beneath our feet to absorb one trillion tons of atmospheric carbon,” says David Perry, CEO and Director of Indigo Agriculture.
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New seeds may help cotton farmers in face of drought, climate change

August 26, 2019 | CBS News
"Virtually every major crop in the U.S. and around the world is at significant risk to climate change, and cotton is no exception to that," Geoffrey Von Maltzahn said.
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U.S. Corn Yield Expected to Be Lowest Since 2012, Indigo Ag Says

August 14, 2019 | Bloomberg
Indigo Ag Inc. is forecasting output of U.S. corn and soybeans to fall sharply after relentless rain in the planting season was followed by dry growing conditions in the Midwestern crop belt.
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How Can We Address Climate Change Through Agriculture?

August 14, 2019 | Forbes
David Perry answered a question on Quora's forum: How can we address climate change through agriculture?
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These Programs Will Pay Kansas Farmers For Crops They Won't Harvest

July 15, 2019 | KCUR
Ag tech company, Indigo Agriculture, has created a carbon marketplace where growers who sequester carbon are paid and businesses, nonprofits or anyone interested in investing in the marketplace can purchase carbon credits, typically used to offset the release of greenhouse gases from some other activity. The company aims to reduce carbon dioxide by 1 trillion tons. Ed Smith is the head of Indigo Carbon, and oversees the company’s Terraton Initiative. If a farmer has a 100-acre field, and puts three tons of carbon dioxide into the ground, Smith says that farmer would be compensated $45 per acre — for a total of $4,500 for the entire field. 
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Why Soil Is Disappearing From Farms

July 11, 2019 | BBC
The processes that generate high-quality, fertile topsoil can take centuries. But the world is ploughing through that resource at an alarming rate. About 40% of the world's land has already been taken over by agriculture, while livestock grazing and expanding urban areas are taking further chunks out of what is left over.  At first glance, it might seem that there is no shortage of mud and dirt around the world. But it's the quality that really counts. 
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Why soil is disappearing from farms

July 11, 2019 | BBC
 The Boston-based firm, Indigo Ag, coats seeds in beneficial microbes in the hope of giving young plants their own ready-made microbiome that will boost the nutrients they receive as they grow, while also acting as a first line of defence against diseases. Coating seeds with pesticides or micronutrients is already a fairly common, if relatively new, approach in the agricultural industry. But adding microorganisms is more unusual, partly because they have a limited shelf life.  Indigo claims that by drying the microbes and mixing them with a polymer on the surface of the seeds, they can be stored for months, if not years, before they are sown. Read More
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