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My Climate Journey: David Perry, President, CEO, and Director of Indigo Ag

January 06, 2020 | My Climate Journey
David Perry and My Climate Journey host Jason Jacobs discuss Indigo’s work to shift the agricultural industry away from a commodity market and towards a model in which farmers make more money, agriculture is more environmentally friendly, and consumers have access to healthier food.
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Analayzing 2019's Wild Weather Year: Could Technology Have Helped?

January 03, 2020 | Successful Farming
Originally published on AgFunder. Lauren Stine discusses 2019's difficult weather patterns and their affect on farmers across the United States. Indigo Ag's GeoInnovation team utilizes technology to provide crucial insights to growers during a difficult season. 
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CNBC Future of Business features David Perry among other entrepreneurs

December 10, 2019 | CNBC
CEO David Perry speaks to CNBC on their "Future of Business" series about Indigo's work alongside farmers to remove one trillion tons of carbon from the atmosphere through regenerative growing practices. Microbial seed treatments, a living map of the world's food supply, and an innovative approach to grain sale supports this goal.
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Alabama Farmer Looks to Cash in on Carbon Storage

December 02, 2019 | The Gadsden Times
Deep in west Alabama, in a part of the state where most economic activity grows up from the ground, one woman is hoping to get paid for what she’s putting back into the soil.
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RFD-TV and Indigo Ag discusss Indigo Carbon, Terraton at NAFB 2019 convention

November 19, 2019 | RFD-TV
At the National Association of Farm Broadcasting 2019 convention, Noah Walker, Indigo Ag's Director of Carbon Product and Business Development, speaks with Marlin Bohling of RFD-TV. The two discuss Indigo Carbon, a program that compensates growers for verified tons of carbon dioxide stored in their soil, and The Terraton Initiative, a global initiative to sequester one trillion tons of atmospheric carbon dioxide within agricultural soils. Learn more from their conversation by watching the video below. 
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Could paying farmers to sequester carbon reverse climate change?

October 03, 2019 | SectorWatch
CEO David Perry discusses the potential for agriculture to help reverse climate change, highlighting photosynthesis as the “huge innovation” people have been waiting for to address the issue.
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How to Get Rid of Carbon Emissions: Pay Farmers to Bury Them

September 11, 2019 | The Wall Street Journal
Indigo Ag Inc., a Boston- based company specializing in agricultural technology and management, is setting up a market for carbon credits. Companies and consumers with voluntary or compulsory commitments to reduce their carbon footprint can, rather than reduce emissions themselves, pay farmers to do it for them. Via the Indigo Carbon marketplace, they can pay farmers like Mr. Hora $15 to sequester one metric ton of carbon dioxide in the soil.
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Q&A: Is Agriculture the Answer to Climate Change?

August 26, 2019 | Modern Farmer
Modern Farmer recently spoke with Indigo Ag CEO David Perry about how the Terraton Initiative works, and how he intends to overcome the obstacles that brought down other farm-based carbon trading platforms.
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The Terraton Initiative: Working to Remove a Trillion Tons of Carbon

August 26, 2019 | foodtank
The Terraton Initiative embodies one specific goal—to remove 1 trillion metric tons of carbon from Earth’s atmosphere. Indigo Agriculture, an agricultural technology company based in Massachusetts, founded and runs the project. To accomplish this goal, the Initiative aims to use “the awesome potential of the soil beneath our feet to absorb one trillion tons of atmospheric carbon,” says David Perry, CEO and Director of Indigo Agriculture.
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New seeds may help cotton farmers in face of drought, climate change

August 26, 2019 | CBS News
"Virtually every major crop in the U.S. and around the world is at significant risk to climate change, and cotton is no exception to that," Geoffrey Von Maltzahn said.
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