We Grow Together

Our Commitment To Growers

The Next Big Idea in Farming Started Under a Microscope
Natural resource scarcity, climate variability, and ever increasing scrutiny from consumers are some of the challenges that modern agriculture is facing today. At Indigo™, we believe that a new generation of microbial products has the potential to address these challenges - to transform agriculture for the better.
It All Begins With Microbes

Organisms so tiny that millions of them fit on the head of a pin. In plants, they occur naturally, helping to fight diseases, increase nutrient intake, and improve water efficiency.

Inspired by insights from the human microbiome, Indigo started with the hypothesis that many of the microbes living inside a plant are vital to its health. With sophisticated sequencing techniques, Indigo has assembled a world-class database of genomic information from these microbes.

Organisms so tiny that millions of them fit on the head of a pin. In plants, they occur naturally, helping to fight diseases, increase nutrient intake, and improve water efficiency.

Inspired by insights from the human microbiome, Indigo started with the hypothesis that many of the microbes living inside a plant are vital to its health. With sophisticated sequencing techniques, Indigo has assembled a world-class database of genomic information from these microbes.

Potentially beneficial microbes are identified and tested, first in the lab, then in the greenhouse, and, finally, over several growing seasons in the field. Once this process is completed, Indigo decides on the most promising microbial formulations and works with manufacturing partners to produce these at scale.

Indigo adds beneficial microbes to crops in the form of a seed coating.
This process results in innovative, naturally derived products that complement a plant's natural processes to improve crop health while increasing yield.

Just like the collaborative relationship between plants and endophytes, we believe a true business partner is one that grows with you. We are committed to sharing risk with you on your acres and are seeking to learn with you as we introduce the first exciting products from our R&D pipeline.

Indigo's team and advisors include respected leaders in agriculture, plant science, the plant and human microbiome, and business. Several of us are growers too, and are passionate about working with you. Together, we can impact agricultural productivity and address the challenges facing our growing world.

We are committed to interacting with you with transparency, honesty, and integrity.

We Grow Together

Just like the collaborative relationship between plants and endophytes, we believe a true business partner is one that grows with you. We are committed to sharing risk with you on your acres and are seeking to learn with you as we introduce the first exciting products from our R&D pipeline.

Indigo's team and advisors include respected leaders in agriculture, plant science, the plant and human microbiome, and business. Several of us are growers too, and are passionate about working with you. Together, we can impact agricultural productivity and address the challenges facing our growing world.

We are committed to interacting with you with transparency, honesty, and integrity.

Planting the Seeds for Better Water Utilization

The precision-based, symbiotic, microbial cotton seed treatment is designed to facilitate rapid plant growth. This results in an enhanced root structure, which enables improved water uptake, thus allowing the plant to better withstand water stressed conditions and boost crop productivity.

Indigo Cotton saw its first field season this year, with 50,000 acres across Texas and the Mid-south.

In addition to cotton, we're pioneering our unique plant-based microbial seed treatment across America's staple cereal grain with the launch of Indigo Wheat. As with cotton, our microbial treatment for wheat promotes water uptake to enable healthier plants and increased crop productivity.

Our first season for Indigo Wheat began this fall on acres across the U.S.

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